This World Is Full Of Terrible People

Aug 01
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Jul 29
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Serbian ultra-nationalists protest in support of Bosnian Serb war criminal Radovan Karadzic, in downtown Belgrade, Tuesday, July 29, 2008. Thousands of extremist Serbs poured into the center of Belgrade to protest the government’s plan to extradite ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic to the U.N. war crimes tribunal.(AP Photo/Srdjan Ilic)

Serbian ultra-nationalists protest in support of Bosnian Serb war criminal Radovan Karadzic, in downtown Belgrade, Tuesday, July 29, 2008. Thousands of extremist Serbs poured into the center of Belgrade to protest the government’s plan to extradite ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic to the U.N. war crimes tribunal.
(AP Photo/Srdjan Ilic)

Jul 22
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A U.N. “safe haven” for Muslim refugees during Bosnia’s war, Srebrenica wound up overrun by Serbian forces under Ratko Mladic.

In a rampage that lasted a week, and led to the worst civilian carnage since World War II, the Serbs separated the men and boys, forced them to strip, killed them and bulldozed their bodies into mass graves.

"Children had their throats slit before their mothers’ eyes," said Fouad Riad, an Egyptian judge.

Just hours before the massacre, Ratko Mladic handed out candy to Muslim children rounded up at the town’s square and consoled them that all would be fine — even patting one child on the head. That sinister image is forever imprinted in the minds of Srebrenica survivors.

Until about five years ago, Mladic regularly ventured into downtown Belgrade, dining at gourmet restaurants and attending soccer matches.

After a few halfhearted attempts by Serbian authorities to close in on him, he moved underground.

The problem has always been the same: Mladic is still widely hailed at home as a patriot.

Tough young men stand on street corners across Serbia, selling black T-shirts that bear Mladic’s image and the words: “Serbian Hero!”

May 23
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May 15
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A man accused of throwing a Molotov cocktail into the woods as firefighters battled large blazes nearby set several other small fires to throw off officers who were pursuing him, police said Thursday.

Police Chief Bill Berger called Brian Crowder “a prime suspect” in a string of fires intentionally set around the city Sunday.

May 12
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Start ‘em young.

Start ‘em young.

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